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Wilson v. Healey

United States District Court, W.D. Pennsylvania

April 9, 2018

ROGER WILSON, Plaintiff,
v.
MIKE HEALEY, Defendant

          Nora Barry Fischer United States District Judge

          REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION

          CYNTHIA REED EDDY, UNITED STATES MAGISTRATE JUDGE.

         1. RECOMMENDATION

         The Court respectfully recommends that Plaintiff's Complaint (ECF No. 6) filed on April 2, 2018, be sua sponte dismissed with prejudice prior to service under 28 U.S.C. §1915(e)(2) because the action is frivolous.

         II. REPORT

         A. Procedural Background

         Within a four-day span, Plaintiff, Roger Wilson, filed ten law suits, pro se, seeking Leave to Proceed in forma pauperis. He voluntarily withdrew four of the cases, Wilson v. Federal A/G Maryland et al., 2:18-cv-00304; Wilson v. Memphis F.C.I. et al., 2:18-cv-00312; Wilson v. FCI Cumberland, 2:18-cv-00313; and Wilson v. FCI Gilmer, et al., 2:18-cv-00315 for “lack of venue”. The six remaining cases filed during that time period are: Wilson v. Delta Airlines, et al., 2:18-cv-00305; Wilson v. Eyster et al., 2:18-cv-00306; Wilson v. McKeesport Police Dept., el al, 2:18-cv-00307; Wilson v. U.S. Gov't/Federal A/g et al., 2:18-cv-00308; Wilson v. Healey, 2:18-cv-00311; and Wilson v. United States of America et al., 2:18-cv-00314.

         Also pending with the court is Wilson v. U.S. Gov't, 2:17-01467, which was filed on November 13, 2017, for which Wilson paid the filing fee. The court also notes that Wilson also filed Wilson v. United States and Office of Atty General, 2:17-cv-00301 on March 8, 2017, for which he paid the filing fee. This case was dismissed pursuant to FRCP 12(b)(1), with prejudice, as amendment would be futile. Wilson filed a notice appealing this decision to the Third Circuit Court of Appeals. (Id. at ECF No. 29).

         B. Legal Standard

         Plaintiff is proceeding pro se and as such, he is entitled to liberal construction of his submissions in federal court. This means that the Court must liberally construe the factual allegations of the complaint because pro se pleadings, “however inartfully pleaded, must be held to less stringent standards than formal pleadings drafted by lawyers.” Erikson v. Pardus, 551 U.S. 89, 94 (2007) (internal quotation omitted); Haines v. Kerner, 404 U.S. 519, 520 (1972). In addition, the court should “‘apply the applicable law, irrespective of whether a pro se litigant has mentioned it by name.'” Higgins v. Beyer, 293 F.3d 683, 688 (3d Cir. 2002) (quoting Holley v. Dep't of Veterans Affairs, 165 F.3d 244, 247-48 (3d Cir. 1999)). However, pro se litigants are not free to ignore the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Pruden v. Long, Civ. A. No. 3:CV-06-2007, 2006 WL 3325439, *1 (M.D. Pa. Oct. 24, 2006).

         Pursuant to 28 U.S.C. §1915(a), Plaintiff requested and has been granted leave to proceed in forma pauperis. Thus, his allegations must be reviewed in accordance with the directives provided in 28 U.S.C. §1915(e). Section 1915(e)(2), as amended, requires the federal courts to review complaints filed by persons[1] who are proceeding in forma pauperis and to dismiss, at any time, any action that is frivolous or malicious, fails to state a claim on which relief may be granted, or seeks monetary relief against a defendant who is immune from such relief. 28 U.S.C. §1915(e)(2)(B). “[A] complaint…is frivolous where it lacks an arguable basis either in law or in fact.” Neitzke v. Williams, 490 U.S. 319, 325 (1989); Hawkins v. Coleman Hall, C.C.F., No. 11-3467, 2011 WL 5970977, at *2 (3d Cir. Nov. 30, 2011) (“An appeal is frivolous when it lacks an arguable basis either in law or fact.” (citing Neitzke, supra). Thus, under §1915(e)(2)(B), courts are “authorized to dismiss a claim as frivolous where ‘it is based on an indisputable meritless legal theory or where the factual contentions are clearly baseless.'” O'Neal v. Remus, No. 09-14661, 2010 WL 1463011, at *1 (E.D. Mich. Mar. 17, 2010) (quoting Price v. Heyrman, No. 06-C-632, 2007 WL 188971, at *1 (E.D. Wis. Jan. 22, 2007) (citing Neitzke, 490 U.S. at 327)).[2]

         In determining whether a complaint fails to state a claim upon which relief may be granted for purposes of Section 1915(e)(2)(B), courts apply the same standard applied to motions to dismiss under Rule 12(b)(6) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. D'Agostino v. CECOM RDEC, 436 Fed.Appx. 70, 72 (3d Cir. 2011) (citing Tourscher v. McCullough, 184 F.3d 236, 240 (3d Cir. 1999)). A complaint must be dismissed pursuant to Rule 12(b)(6) if it does not allege “enough facts to state a claim to relief that is plausible on its face.” Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 554, 556 (2007) (rejecting the traditional 12(b)(6) standard set forth in Conley v. Gibson, 355 U.S. 41, 45-46 (1957)); Ashcroft v. Iqbal, 556 U.S. 662, 678 (2009) (citing Twombly). “A claim has facial plausibility when the plaintiff pleads factual content that allows the court to draw the reasonable inference that the defendant is liable for the misconduct alleged.” Iqbal, 556 U.S. at 678 (citing Twombly, 550 U.S. at 556). The United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit has expounded on this standard in light of its decision in Phillips v. County of Allegheny, 515 F.3d 224 (3d Cir. 2008) (construing Twombly in a civil rights context), and the Supreme Court's decision in Iqbal:

After Iqbal, it is clear that conclusory or “bare-bones” allegations will no longer survive a motion to dismiss: “threadbare recitals of the elements of a cause of action, supported by mere conclusory statements, do not suffice.” Iqbal, 129 S.Ct. at 1949. To prevent dismissal, all civil complaints must now set out “sufficient factual matter” to show that the claim is facially plausible. This then “allows the court to draw the reasonable inference that the defendant is liable for the misconduct alleged.” Id. at 1948. The Supreme Court's ruling in Iqbal emphasizes that a plaintiff must show that the allegations of his or her complaints are plausible. See Id. at 1949-50; see also Twombly, 505 U.S. at 555, & n. 3.

Fowler v. UPMC Shadyside, 578 F.3d 203, 210 (3d Cir. 2009). In making this determination, the court must accept as true all allegations of the complaint and all reasonable factual inferences must be viewed in the light most favorable to the plaintiff. Angelastro v. Prudential-Bache Sec., Inc., 764 F.2d 939, 944 (3d Cir. 1985). “To the extent that a complaint filed in forma pauperis which fails to state a claim lacks even an arguable basis in law, Rule ...


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