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Randall Duchesneau v. Cornell University

July 31, 2012

RANDALL DUCHESNEAU,
PLAINTIFF,
v.
CORNELL UNIVERSITY, ET AL., DEFENDANTS.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: Jones, II, U.S.D.J.

MEMORANDUM

Before the Court is Defendant Tumbl Trak's ("T-Trak") Motion for Partial Summary Judgment (Docket No. 169); Cornell University's Motion for Summary Judgment (Docket No. 171); Cornell University's Motion for Partial Summary Judgment on Punitive Damages (Docket No. 172); and extensive briefing related thereto.*fn1

Under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 56(c), summary judgment is appropriate "if the pleadings, depositions, answers to interrogatories, and admissions on file, together with the affidavits, if any, show that there is no genuine issue as to any material fact and that the moving party is entitled to a judgment as a matter of law." Fed. R. Civ. P. 56(c); Celotex Corp. v. Catrett, 477 U.S. 317, 322 (1986). To defeat a motion for summary judgment, disputes must be both (1) material, meaning concerning facts that will affect the outcome of the issue under substantive law, and (2) genuine, meaning the evidence must be "such that a reasonable jury could return a verdict for the nonmoving party." Anderson v. Liberty Lobby, Inc., 477 U.S. 242, 248 (1986). Summary judgment is mandated "against a party who fails to make a showing sufficient to establish the existence of an element essential to that party's case, and on which that party will bear the burden of proof at trial." Celotex, 477 U.S. at 322. An issue is genuine if the fact finder could reasonably return a verdict in favor of the nonmoving party with respect to that issue. Anderson, 477 U.S. at 249. In reviewing a motion for summary judgment, the court does not make credibility determinations and "must view facts and inferences in the light most favorable to the party opposing the motion." Siegel Transfer, Inc. v. Carrier Express, Inc., 54 F.3d 1125, 1127 (3d Cir. 1995).

I. T-Trak's Motion for Partial Summary Judgment

T-Trak seeks partial summary judgment on three bases: (1) Plaintiff cannot establish a prima facie case of failure to warn; (2) Plaintiff is not entitled to punitive damages; and (3) Plaintiff assumed the risk of serious injury when using the Tumbl Trak apparatus ("TTA"). I address these seriatim.

1. Failure to Warn

Under New York law,*fn2 to establish a prima facie case of failure to warn, a Plaintiff must show that (1) the defendant-manufacturer had a duty to warn; (2) the manufacturer breached such duty and so the product is rendered defective, i.e., reasonably certain to be dangerous; (3) the product's defect was the proximate cause of the injury to plaintiff; and (4) the plaintiff suffered loss or damage. Humphrey v. Diamant Boart, Inc., 556 F. Supp. 2d 167, 179 (E.D.N.Y. 2008); McCarthy v. Olin Corp., 119 F.3d 148, 156 (2d Cir. 1997). The duty to warn can be breached by either "the complete absence of warnings as to a particular hazard," or "the inclusion of warnings which are insufficient." Johnson v. Johnson Chem. Co., 588 N.Y.S.2d 607, 610 (N.Y. App. Div. 1992). The adequacy of a warning is normally a question of fact to be determined at trial. Nagel v. Bros. Int'l Foods, Inc., 825 N.Y.S.2d 93, 95 (N.Y. App. Div. 2006).

Plaintiff has the burden of proving that T-Trak's failure to warn was a proximate cause of his injury. See Mulhall v. Hannafin, 841 N.Y.S.2d 282, 285 (N.Y. App. Div. 2007). This burden includes adducing proof that a user of the product at issue would have read and heeded a warning had one been given. Sosna v. Am. Home Prods., 748 N.Y.S.2d 548, 549 (N.Y. App. Div. 2002). Conversely, failure to warn claims can be decided as a matter of law against an injured party where the injured party was "fully aware of the hazard through general knowledge, observation, or common sense" or where the hazard is "patently dangerous." Humphrey, 556 F. Supp. 2d at 179-80 (citing Liriano v. Hobart Corp. (Liriano I), 700 N.E.2d 303, 308 (1998)).

T-Trak contends that Plaintiff cannot establish a prima facie case of failure to warn where (1) the risk of injury was open and obvious and (2) Plaintiff did not actually read the warnings that were on the TTA. First T-Trak argues that "the risk of injury while performing a back flip was open and obvious and readily discernable to Plaintiff." Def.'s Mot. Part. Summ. J. (hereinafter "Def.'s Br.") 21. More specifically, T-Trak opines that general knowledge dictates that "an individual might land on his head if he attempts a back flip on a rebounding [TTA]." Id. T-Trak relies on, inter alia, the following record evidence:

* "Plaintiff, educated in physics, knew that what goes up will come down." Id. 22; see id. Ex. H, at 380-81.

* Plaintiff signed a waiver that stated he understood the risks and dangers associated with gymnastics. Id. Ex. F.

* There was a small warning label on the TTA which stated that any activity "creates the possibility of catastrophic injury, including paralysis or even death from falling on the head or neck. Id. Ex. G.

* Plaintiff "was aware of the safety concept of spotting and had done it in high school as a member of the cheerleading squad." Id. 23; see id. Ex. H, at 432.

Based on these facts, T-Trak contends that "common sense" would have informed an individual that he or she was risking landing on their head by using the TTA, and, as such, ...


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