Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Charles Mcnair; Theodore Austin; Danielle v. Synapse Group Inc.

March 6, 2012

CHARLES MCNAIR; THEODORE AUSTIN; DANIELLE DEMETRIOU; USHMA DESAI; JULIE DYNKO, APPELLANTS
v.
SYNAPSE GROUP INC.



On Appeal from the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey (D.C. No. 06-cv-5072) District Judge: Hon. Jose L. Linares

The opinion of the court was delivered by: Jordan, Circuit Judge.

PRECEDENTIAL

Argued January 10, 2012

Before: FUENTES, JORDAN, and NYGAARD, Circuit Judges.

OPINION OF THE COURT

A group of former customers (collectively, "Appellants" or "the named plaintiffs") of Synapse Group Inc. ("Synapse") successfully petitioned under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23(f)*fn1 for interlocutory review of an order denying class certification. More specifically, Appellants challenge the decision of the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey to deny certification of a Rule 23(b)(2) injunctive relief class consisting of Synapse customers who received automatic renewal notifications in connection with magazine subscriptions obtained through Synapse. Because we conclude that Appellants, none of whom are current Synapse customers, lack standing to seek the remedy they are pursuing on behalf of the class, we will affirm the District Court's order denying class certification.*fn2

I. Background

A. Synapse's Magazine Sales

Synapse, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Time Inc. ("Time"), is the largest marketer of magazine subscriptions in the United States. It conducts its business operations under several other names, including Magazine Direct, New Sub Magazine Services, SynapseConnect, Synapse Solutions, and CAP Systems. Aiming to "bring magazine publishers and potential subscribers together by promoting trial offers that might evolve into long-term subscriptions," Synapse markets over 800 magazines to consumers through "credit card issuers, catalogers, retailers, airlines, and internet companies." (App. at 643.)

The majority of Synapse's magazine subscriptions are offered under what is known as a "continuous service plan" whereby a customer's subscription does not expire unless and until the customer opts to cancel it. To secure subscribers to those plans, Synapse offers introductory promotional offers under which customers can receive magazine subscriptions for free or at greatly reduced rates. Although the offers are varied, all customers provide a credit or debit card number upon signing up and are informed that, once the promotional rate expires, their card will be charged at the regular subscription rate, unless the subscription is cancelled.

1. Synapse's Advance Notification of Future Charges

Prior to processing charges for the promised rate increase, however, Synapse provides its customers with advance notice. That notice, made in accordance with the terms of Synapse's initial offer, explains the impending charge for continued services and provides a toll-free telephone number for the customer to call to cancel his or her magazine subscriptions. Before 2009, Synapse provided the majority of those notifications by sending its customers a sealed double postcard with a visible exterior and a concealed interior (the "Standard Postcard"). The front of the Standard Postcard's exterior was addressed to the customer and contained no other text besides a return address. The back of the Standard Postcard's exterior appeared as follows:

(App. at 507.) The Standard Postcard's interior, which, again, was only visible if opened, stated the names of the magazines subscribed to, the number of issues ordered, the cost of the automatic renewal, and a toll-free number for customers to call to cancel their magazine subscriptions, if they so desired.

Synapse's market testing demonstrated that an explicit statement on the exterior of the Standard Postcard that it was an "automatic renewal notice" or an "automatic magazine renewal" would increase the number of pre-billing cancellations. For example, adding the words "Your Automatic Magazine Renewal Notice" to the front of the

Standard Postcard's exterior resulted in an increase of several percentage points in pre-billing cancellations. An expert retained by Appellants took that into account in opining that the Standard Postcard was "intentionally designed to avoid giving customers notice of renewal." (App. at 1098.)

Beginning in February 2009, Synapse voluntarily began using a new, non-folded, postcard to provide its advance notifications to customers (the "Single Postcard"). Unlike the Standard Postcard, the Single Postcard contains no interior. The back of the Single Postcard has a picture of magazines in a mailbox and states that magazine subscriptions are available for up to 40% off newsstand prices. The front of the Single Postcard contains two panels. On the left side, it states in large print: "The low rate for your next year of issues is guaranteed!" (App. at 1483.) And then, in smaller print, it says:

We guarantee a hassle-free subscription. You'll never miss an issue. No bills, reminders, publisher renewal notices and no telemarketing calls. We do the work for you by automatically extending your subscription each year for as long as you want your selections.

Your service includes convenient home delivery and huge savings off the newsstand price .

We guarantee to send you advance notice every year about your next subscription period and rates. We will send you notice that spells out: your guaranteed low rate, your number of issues and when your credit card will be charged. If you don't wish ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.