Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Alicia English v. Greyhound Bus Lines

October 19, 2011

ALICIA ENGLISH,
PLAINTIFF
v.
GREYHOUND BUS LINES, INC., DEFENDANT



The opinion of the court was delivered by: Timothy R. Rice U.S. Magistrate Judge

MEMORANDUM OPINION

I. INTRODUCTION

This case arises from a February 24, 2008 accident involving a Greyhound bus.

Greyhound stipulates to its negligence, but the parties disagree on bus passenger Alicia English's damages. English alleges she suffered neck and back injuries. English acknowledges a history of alcohol and illicit drug abuse, and she seeks to exclude such evidence. See Plaintiff's Motion in Limine to Preclude Evidence of Plaintiff's Illicit Drug and Alcohol Abuse at 2-4, English v. Greyhound Bus Lines, Inc., No. 10-613 (E.D. Pa. Aug. 17, 2011) [hereinafter Pl. Motion]. Greyhound claims evidence of English's substance abuse is relevant to her damages and her medical treatment history before and after the accident. Defendant's Memorandum of Law at 3, English v. Greyhound Bus Lines, Inc., No. 10-613 (E.D. Pa. Oct. 7, 2011) [hereinafter Def. Memo. of Law].

Although the high probative value of the substance abuse evidence is not substantially outweighed by the risk of unfair prejudice to English, see Fed. R. Evid. 403, a high risk of unfair prejudice remains. For the reasons that follow, her motion is granted on the condition that English stipulates: (1) she will not seek damages for the lien from the State of New York for prescription drug payments; and (2) she lacked consistency with her medical care both before and after the accident. This stipulation will diminish the probative value of her substance abuse and tip the Rule 403 balance in her favor. Otherwise, her motion is denied since the probative value and risk of unfair prejudice are equally high.

II. FACTUAL HISTORY

English sought treatment for neck pain in January of 2006, two years before the bus accident. Def. Memo. of Law at Ex. A. Greyhound contends English was unable to undergo breast reduction surgery, which had been recommended to help alleviate her neck pain, because she could not first attain the required one year of sobriety. Id. at 5-6.

After the bus accident, English was instructed to attend physical therapy sessions three times per week. Id. at 2. She attended only nine sessions over three months. Id. At her deposition, English testified she missed several physical therapy appointments because her drug and alcohol abuse would cause her to miss her ride. See Pl. Motion at 2-4. She also testified she was hungover during physical therapy, and she was told her alcohol use affected her symptoms. Id.

An orthopedic physician hired by Greyhound has noted English's history of substance abuse. Def. Mem. of Law, Ex. B. at 12. He opined that her "need for narcotic usage has increased rather than diminished, even after her [post-accident] cervical spine surgery." Id. Thus, Greyhound contends English's claim for reimbursement of prescription drug expenses is not completely related to the accident. Def. Memo. of Law at 6-7.

III. DISCUSSION

The Federal Rules of Evidence define "relevant evidence" broadly. See Fed. R. Evid. 401 ("'Relevant evidence' means evidence having any tendency to make the existence of any fact that is of consequence to the determination of the action more probable or less probable than it would be without the evidence."); Hurley v. Atlantic City Police Dep't, 174 F.3d 95, 109-10 (3d Cir. 1999) ("Rule 401 does not raise a high standard."). Evidence of English's illicit drug and alcohol use is relevant in at least three ways:

First, in a negligence action, a jury can consider whether the plaintiff has failed to mitigate damages. English's illicit drug and alcohol use is relevant to show her alleged failure to mitigate damages because, according to English's deposition testimony, she missed several physical therapy appointments due to her substance use. See Pl. Motion at 2-4. English said that drinking alcohol and using cocaine affected her ability to attend physical therapy because she "would miss [her] ride" and was hungover while she was undergoing physical therapy. Id. at 2-3. She also continued to use alcohol despite being warned it was affecting her symptoms. Id. at 3.

Second, English's drug and alcohol use is relevant to rebut English's claim that the bus crash was the sole cause of her neck injury. English sought treatment for neck pain in January of 2006, more than two years before the bus accident. Def. Memo. of Law at Ex. A. Greyhound alleges English's doctor recommended she have breast reduction surgery to help alleviate her neck pain before the accident, but English was unable to do so because she could not first attain the required one year of sobriety. Id. at 5-6. Such evidence is relevant to the questions of causation and the extent of her damages from the accident.

Third, English's drug and alcohol abuse is relevant to challenge English's damages for prescription drug expenses. Dr. David R. Pashman, an orthopedic physician hired by Greyhound, noted English had a history of substance abuse and concluded her "need for narcotic usage has increased, rather than diminished, even after her cervical spine surgery." Def.'s Mem. of Law, Ex. B at 12. English's history of substance abuse has some tendency to prove that at least some ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.