Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Bradley v. Attorney General of the United States

April 22, 2010

HEATH CLIFFE JOHN BRADLEY, PETITIONER
v.
ATTORNEY GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES, RESPONDENT



On Petition for Review of an Administrative Order of Removal of the Department of Homeland Security Ordering Removal pursuant to 8 U.S.C. § 1187 (A87-074-865).

The opinion of the court was delivered by: Aldisert, Circuit Judge.

PRECEDENTIAL

Argued March 11, 2010

Before: AMBRO, SMITH and ALDISERT, Circuit Judges.

OPINION OF THE COURT

Petitioner Heathcliffe John Bradley, a citizen and national of New Zealand, seeks review of a final removal order of the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement ("the Department"). Bradley contends that the Department's removal order is void under Woodby v. INS, 385 U.S. 276, 286 (1966), because the record lacks "clear, unequivocal, and convincing evidence" that he waived his right to contest his removal under the Visa Waiver Program ("VWP"), 8 U.S.C. § 1187. Bradley additionally contends that he did not validly waive his right to contest his removal under the VWP because his waiver was not "knowing and voluntary." Finally, Bradley contends that, notwithstanding any VWP waiver, he may renew his application for a marriage-based adjustment of status before an immigration judge. See 8 U.S.C. § 1255(c)(4). For the reasons that follow, we will deny his petition.*fn1

I.

Bradley arrived in the United States on August 28, 1996 without a valid non-immigrant visa, but was admitted under the VWP. Bradley represents that he was intoxicated when he arrived, and he claims to have little recollection of his admission. Nevertheless, Bradley's declaration establishes that, after his arrival, he signed a form, presented that form to a customs officer, and was admitted into the United States. According to Bradley,

[u]pon my arrival at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, I was given a form to complete, which I vaguely recall completing or even signing for that matter. . . . I handed the form to the Custom's agent, who waived me through after taking a part of my form, without any questions.

(Bradley Decl. ¶¶ 18, 20 (errors in original).) According to his Form I-94W Departure Record, Bradley was authorized to remain in the United States for the 90-day period ending November 27, 1996. (App.*fn2 8.) It is undisputed that Bradley remained in the United States beyond his authorized stay, and that he remains here still.

On July 29, 2006, Bradley married Cheryl Losee, a United States citizen. In December 2007 and with the assistance of an attorney, Bradley and Losee applied to United States Citizenship and Immigration Services to adjust Bradley's status to that of a lawful permanent resident. In conjunction with that application, Bradley's wife filed an I-130 immediate-relative visa petition, a prerequisite to obtaining a marriage-based adjustment of status. That petition was denied pursuant to 8 C.F.R. § 103.2(b)(13) when Bradley and Losee failed to appear for a scheduled interview.

On October 8, 2008, Bradley was arrested and ordered removed, pursuant to 8 U.S.C. § 1187(b). On October 14, 2008, Bradley filed a Petition for Review in this Court and moved for a stay of removal. On November 10, 2008, we stayed Bradley's removal order, and on November 14, 2008, Bradley was released from incarceration, pending our review.

II.

Before we address Bradley's contentions, we first review the purpose and role of the VWP within our ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.