Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Arthur Andersen LLP v. Carlisle

May 4, 2009

ARTHUR ANDERSEN LLP, ET AL., PETITIONERS
v.
WAYNE CARLISLE ET AL.



On Writ Of Certiorari To The United States Court Of Appeals For The Sixth Circuit Court Below: 521 F. 3d 597

SYLLABUS BY THE COURT

OCTOBER TERM, 2008

Argued March 3, 2009

After consulting with petitioners, respondents Wayne Carlisle, James Bushman, and Gary Strassel used a shelter to minimize taxes from the sale of their company. Limited liability corporations created by Carlisle, Bushman, and Strassel (also respondents) entered into investment-management agreements with Bricolage Capital, LLC, that provided for arbitration of disputes. After the Internal Revenue Service found the tax shelter illegal, respondents filed a diversity suit against petitioners. Claiming that equitable estoppel required respondents to arbitrate their claims per the agreements with Bricolage, petitioners invoked §3 of the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA), 9 U. S. C. §3, which entitles litigants to stay an action that is "referable to arbitration under an agreement in writing." Section 16(a)(1)(A) of the FAA allows an appeal from "an order ... refusing a stay of any action under section 3." The District Court denied petitioners' stay motions, and the Sixth Circuit dismissed their interlocutory appeal for want of jurisdiction.

Held:

1. The Sixth Circuit had jurisdiction to review the denial of petitioners' requests for a §3 stay. By its clear and unambiguous terms, §16(a)(1)(A) entitles any litigant asking for a §3 stay to an immediate appeal from that motion's denial -- regardless of whether the litigant is in fact eligible for a stay. Jurisdiction over the appeal "must be determined by focusing upon the category of order appealed from, rather than upon the strength of the grounds for reversing the order," Behrens v. Pelletier, 516 U. S. 299, 311. The statute unambiguously makes the underlying merits irrelevant, for even a request's utter frivolousness cannot turn a denial into something other than "an order ... refusing a stay of any action under section 3," §16(a)(1)(A). Pp. 3-5.

2. A litigant who was not a party to the arbitration agreement may invoke §3 if the relevant state contract law allows him to enforce the agreement. Neither FAA §2 -- the substantive mandate making written arbitration agreements "valid, irrevocable, and enforceable, save upon such grounds as exist at law or in equity for the revocation of a contract" -- nor §3 purports to alter state contract law regarding the scope of agreements. Accordingly, whenever the relevant state law would make a contract to arbitrate a particular dispute enforceable by a nonsignatory, that signatory is entitled to request and obtain a stay under §3 because that dispute is "referable to arbitration under an agreement in writing." Because traditional state-law principles allow enforcement of contracts by (or against) nonparties through, e.g., assumption or third-party beneficiary theories, the Sixth Circuit erred in holding that §3 relief is categorically not available to nonsignatories. Questions as to the nature and scope of the applicable state contract law in the present case have not been briefed here and can be addressed on remand. Pp. 5-8

The opinion of the court was delivered by: Justice Scalia

Opinion of the Court

556 U. S. ____ (2009)

Section 3 of the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) entitles litigants in federal court to a stay of any action that is "referable to arbitration under an agreement in writing." 9 U. S. C. §3. Section 16(a)(1)(A), in turn, allows an appeal from "an order ... refusing a stay of any action under section 3." We address in this case whether appellate courts have jurisdiction under §16(a) to review denials of stays requested by litigants who were not parties to the relevant arbitration agreement, and whether §3 can ever mandate a stay in such circumstances.

I.

Respondents Wayne Carlisle, James Bushman, and Gary Strassel set out to minimize their taxes from the 1999 sale of their construction-equipment company. Arthur Andersen LLP, a firm that had long served as their company's accountant, auditor, and tax adviser, introduced them to Bricolage Capital, LLC, which in turn referred them for legal advice to Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle, LLP. According to respondents, these advisers recommended a "leveraged option strategy" tax shelter designed to create illusory losses through foreign-currency-exchange options. As a part of the scheme, respondents invested in various stock warrants through newly created limited liability corporations (LLCs), which are also respondents in this case. The respondent LLCs entered into investment-management agreements with Bricolage, specifying that "[a]ny controversy arising out of or relating to this Agreement or the br[ea]ch thereof, shall be settled by arbitration conducted in New York, New York, in accordance with the Commercial Arbitration Rules of the American Arbitration Association." App. 80-81, 99-100, 118-119.

As with all that seems too good to be true, a controversy did indeed arise. The warrants respondents purchased turned out to be almost entirely worthless, and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) determined in August 2000 that the "leveraged option strategy" scheme was an illegal tax shelter. The IRS initially offered conditional amnesty to taxpayers who had used such arrangements, but petitioners failed to inform respondents of that option. ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.