Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

KATHLEEN S. v. DEPARTMENT OF PUB. WELFARE OF PENNS

June 26, 1998

KATHLEEN S., et al.
v.
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA, et al.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: BRODERICK

MEMORANDUM

 Plaintiffs are a class who were residents of Haverford State Hospital as of August 26, 1997. Haverford State Hospital is a state-operated psychiatric hospital located in Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Plaintiffs bring this class action against the Department of Public Welfare of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and Feather O. Houstoun in her official capacity as Secretary of Public Welfare (collectively "DPW"). On February 25, 1998, this Court certified a Plaintiff class including all persons institutionalized at Haverford State Hospital as of August 26, 1997, the date that the Commonwealth announced the closure of Haverford State Hospital, which is scheduled for next Tuesday, June 30, 1998.

 The Court held a bench trial which commenced on May 11, 1998. In connection therewith, the Court makes the following findings of fact and conclusions of law.

 The members of the Plaintiff class are all individuals with mental illness. In their amended complaint filed December 15, 1997, they allege violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act ("ADA"), 42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq. The Plaintiff class alleges that DPW is in violation of the ADA because the class members have been discriminated against through DPW's failure to provide them with services in the most integrated setting appropriate to their needs, in violation of 42 U.S.C. § 12132 and 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d). The Plaintiff class also alleges that DPW is in violation of the ADA in that it has utilized discriminatory methods of administration by failing to appropriately plan for the development of community services wherein the mentally ill can receive appropriate treatment within a reasonable time of their having been declared appropriate for community placement. Plaintiffs allege that DPW's past methods of administration have had the effect of discriminating against class members who have been or should have been evaluated as appropriate for community placement in that these methods of administration have subjected class members to continued, unnecessary segregation in an institution, in violation of 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(b)(3)(i). Plaintiffs seek an order of this Court declaring that DPW has discriminated against class members who have been or should have been evaluated as appropriate for community placement, and mandating that DPW provide them with community-based services at dates earlier than those planned by DPW.

 On August 26, 1997, Secretary of Public Welfare Feather Houstoun announced DPW's decision to close Haverford State Hospital on or before June 30, 1998. In her announcement Secretary Houstoun stated:

 
The closure of Haverford State Hospital reflects a statewide and national trend in placing people with mental illness in community settings rather than in institutions[.] In 1969 we had 27,500 patients in care in 17 state hospitals and two long-term care facilities. Following today's closure of Haverford State Hospital, 3,900 patients will be in care in nine state hospitals and one long-term care facility in the Commonwealth.

 Secretary Houstoun further noted that the decision was "necessary, cost-effective and appropriate to serving the needs of people living with mental illness," and that "an integrated system of community and residential support ... makes good sense for the consumer, the taxpayer and the entire community." Secretary Houstoun also stated that persons who have been discharged from state-operated institutions "are better able to maintain a safe and decent quality of life outside of an institutional setting."

 Indeed, there appears to be consensus among professionals in the field of mental health that most, if not all, people with serious and persistent mental illness can be successfully and safely served in the community, if the appropriate services and supports are provided. During the past twenty-five years, the number of persons residing in state psychiatric hospitals has decreased as a result of the development of effective new medications, and the development and expansion of alternative community treatment programs. According to Charles Currie, Deputy Secretary for DPW's Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, it is DPW's vision that "all individuals with serious mental illness have the opportunity to live their lives in the community."

 Although the decision to close Haverford State Hospital was not announced until August 1997, the closure of Haverford State Hospital had been contemplated since at least June 1994, when the Southeast Region Task Force (the "Task Force") was convened by former Secretary of Public Welfare Karen Snider. The Task Force was charged with "the goal of developing a five-year plan for the operation and utilization of Haverford State Hospital and Norristown State Hospital with the specific objective of further integrating the resources of these facilities with community mental health programs." The Task Force's voting members included mental health consumers (i.e. mentally ill individuals who utilize the services of the Commonwealth's mental health system), family members of the mental health consumers, and mental health professionals. The Task Force's non-voting members included representatives of Haverford State Hospital and Norristown State Hospital staff, union representatives, and other professionals. DPW and county mental health staff provided technical support to the Task Force.

 The Task Force issued a report (the "Task Force Report") on November 9, 1994. The Task Force Report noted that the Commonwealth had adopted a conceptual framework for the treatment of the mentally ill called the Community Support Program, a model designed specifically for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness. A basic tenet of the Community Support Program model is that the community is the preferred locus for mental health treatment and support. Inpatient care is designated for evaluation and short term stabilization, except for a small number of individuals who may need longer term hospitalization.

 The Task Force Report reported that the Commonwealth had begun re-structuring its mental health system with the goal of creating an integrated system of care. That restructuring included the closing of Philadelphia State Hospital, which was unique in that, for the first time, funding that previously supported a state hospital was used to create a network of new and innovative community programs for the consumers who were in the hospital and for those who would have used the hospital had it remained open. As a result, the same level of funding that once supported approximately 500 people in Philadelphia State Hospital was used to provide community-based care for 450 former residents and a minimum of 1500 additional consumers who had been diverted from state hospitalization. The Task Force Report also reported a very low recidivism rate for consumers who had been discharged to the sorts of programs that were developed in connection with the closing of Philadelphia State Hospital.

 The Task Force concluded that many state hospital residents "had stabilized to the point where a less structured residential setting could provide the necessary supports for a successful community placement." The Task Force Report stated that "the counties agree that most of the people currently residing in Haverford State Hospital and Norristown State Hospital can be served in community-based settings with adequate supports, to be developed over the next five years." The Task Force recommended consolidating Haverford State Hospital and Norristown State Hospital into one facility.

 Attached to the Task Force Report were funding proposals from the five southeastern Pennsylvania counties (Delaware, Chester, Bucks, Montgomery and Philadelphia) to the Commonwealth, which provides the bulk of funding for community-based mental health services. The Task Force recommended implementing and funding these proposals, known as CHIPP, or Community Hospital Integration Project Programs. CHIPP is a funding program in addition to DPW's general mental health allocations to the counties for community-based services. Through CHIPP, DPW allocates funding to a particular county or counties for the specific purpose of developing the resources necessary to discharge residents of those counties from state psychiatric hospitals. CHIPP is designed to assure that the infrastructure for interventions and treatments in the community is in place in order to accommodate and support individuals as they are discharged from state institutions. CHIPP projects always link the provision of community-based services to the closure of beds in the state psychiatric facilities, and CHIPP has been the primary avenue for expansion of community-based care, especially for persons with serious and persistent mental illness. CHIPP is funded completely by the Commonwealth.

 In its CHIPP proposal attached to the Task Force's 1994 Report, Chester County proposed to develop community-based services to allow for the discharge of twelve state hospital residents in each of the five years of the Task Force's proposed plan. Delaware County, which estimated that 80% of its residents in state hospitals could be served in the community, submitted a five-year CHIPP proposal to develop community-based services to allow for the discharge of an average of 40 residents per year (with fewer in the first year and increased numbers in subsequent years). These CHIPP proposals, if approved, would have allowed development of community services for most Chester and Delaware county residents institutionalized at Haverford State Hospital.

 In November 1994, the Task Force shared its Report with the administration of the new Governor-elect and requested action upon its recommendations. However, the administration took no action on the Task Force Report until 1997. In January 1997, Deputy Secretary Curie convened the Southeast Region Mental Health Steering Committee (the "Steering Committee") to review the recommendations of the Task Force issued in November 1994. The Steering Committee, consisting of the mental health administrators of the five southeastern Pennsylvania counties, a mental health consumer representative, and a family representative, confirmed the validity of the Task Force's 1994 recommendations.

 In January 1997, the Steering Committee asked Haverford State Hospital to identify how many residents could be served outside Haverford State Hospital with no more than twelve additional months of inpatient treatment. At the meeting of the Steering Committee in March 1997, Haverford State Hospital identified approximately 225 residents who could be served in the community. In March 1997, the Steering Committee recommended consolidating Haverford State Hospital and Norristown State Hospital and transferring the state hospital funding used for the closed hospital to county programs to develop a comprehensive community-based service system.

 As early as May 1997, DPW officials expected that the consolidation of Haverford State Hospital and Norristown State Hospital would be complete by June 30, 1998. However, it was not until after DPW announced the closure of Haverford State Hospital in August 1997 that DPW requested the counties to submit plans for the closure of Haverford State Hospital and the discharge of Haverford State Hospital residents. DPW did not initially request the counties to submit multi-year plans. DPW asked the counties to submit a four-year plan on or around December 4, 1997.

 In March 1998 -- about seven months after the announced closure of Haverford State Hospital -- DPW issued its Southeast Region Community Mental Health Services Plan (the "Southeast Region Plan" or "Plan") to govern the closure of Haverford State Hospital and its consolidation with Norristown State Hospital. DPW finalized and publicly distributed the Southeast Region Plan on March 9, 1998. The Plan recognizes that "the community is the preferred locus for mental health treatment and support." DPW explained:

 Inpatient hospitalization care is designated for evaluation and short-term stabilization, except for the small number of people who may need longer-term hospitalization. Both experience and research have substantiated the effectiveness of a comprehensive community support system. Studies conducted by the National Institute for Mental Health, the Center for Mental Health Services and the University of Pennsylvania have concluded that comprehensive community support systems reduce the reliance on hospitalization and improve the level of functioning, quality of life and satisfaction of persons with severe mental illness.

 After DPW announced its decision to close Haverford State Hospital on August 26, 1997, it evaluated Haverford State Hospital residents to determine which residents were appropriate for discharge to community-based programs and the types of programs they need, and which residents need continued inpatient hospitalization. Pursuant to the Southeast Region Plan, DPW's Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services developed a process to assess the needs and long-range placement plans for each Haverford State Hospital resident. The individual evaluations of Haverford State Hospital residents by DPW were to have been completed by September 30, 1997. That deadline was then extended to October 31, 1997. The individual evaluations of Haverford State Hospital residents by DPW were not completed, however, until January 1998.

 As heretofore pointed out, the Plaintiff class consists of 255 class members who were confined at Haverford State Hospital as of August 26, 1997, the date on which DPW announced its decision to close the hospital on June 30, 1998. The Court will divide the class members into the following three subclasses for the purposes of this memorandum and this Court's orders:

 Subclass A consists of approximately 88 class members who have been identified by DPW as appropriate for community placement and concerning whom DPW has represented to the Court that these approximately 88 class members will be placed in community treatment facilities appropriate to their needs on or before June 30, 1998.

 Subclass B consists of approximately 95 class members who have been identified by DPW as appropriate for treatment in the community but who have been or will be transferred to Norristown State Hospital by June 30, 1998, and for whom facilities and services are not presently available for their treatment in the community.

 Subclass C consists of approximately 68 class members who have been identified by DPW as not now appropriate for treatment in the community, and who have been or will be transferred to Norristown State Hospital by June 30, 1998.

 Claims of Plaintiff Class Members

 The Plaintiff class claims that they have been discriminated against in violation of Section 202 of Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and regulations promulgated thereunder by the Department of Justice, 28 C.F.R. §§ 35.130(d) and 35.130(b)(3).

 Section 202 of Title II provides:

 
no qualified individual with a disability shall, by reason of such disability, be excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of the services, programs, or activities of a public entity, or be subjected to discrimination by any such entity.

 42 U.S.C. § 12132.

 ADA regulation § 35.130(d) provides as follows:

 
A public entity shall administer services, programs, and activities in the most integrated setting appropriate to the needs of qualified individuals with disabilities.

 28 C.F.R. § 35.130(d).

 ADA regulation 35.130(b)(3) provides in pertinent part:

 
A public entity may not, directly or through contractual or other arrangements, utilize criteria or methods of administration:
 
(I) that have the effect of subjecting qualified individuals with disabilities to discrimination on ...

Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.