Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Otis Elevator Co. v. George Washington Hotel Corp.

argued: May 13, 1994.

OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY, APPELLEE
v.
GEORGE WASHINGTON HOTEL CORPORATION, STANLEY S. BAZANT, STANLEY S. BAZANT, APPELLANT



Appeal from the United States District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania. (D.C. Civil Action No. 91-1966).

Before: Becker, Lewis, Circuit Judges and Pollak, District Judge*fn*

Author: Pollak

Opinion OF THE COURT

POLLAK, District Judge.

This diversity case arises out of a contractual dispute between Stanley Bazant, a hotel owner, and Otis Elevator Company. Intertwined with certain procedural questions is one substantive question of Pennsylvania law. That question concerns the construction of a so-called "automatic renewal provision" -- that is, a contractual provision pursuant to which a contract for a term is renewed automatically for a further term unless, before a specified date, one party gives notice of an intent to terminate. The district court held that Bazant's late notice of his intent to terminate the contract did not suffice to avoid renewal. On appeal, Bazant argues that his late notice ought to have been deemed sufficient since Otis did not demonstrate that it would be prejudiced by Bazant's tardiness. Bazant relies on a Pennsylvania Superior Court decision -- Music, Inc. v. Henry B. Klein Co., 213 Pa. Super. 182, 245 A.2d 650 (Pa. Super. 1968) -- which appears to be the only Pennsylvania appellate case directly addressing the question. In Music, the Superior Court was sharply divided. Since Music, and prior to the case at bar, the question has been addressed on at least three occasions by district Judges in this circuit, and Music has received mixed reviews. We conclude that in the case at bar the district court correctly declined to follow the prevailing opinion in Music -- an opinion which we think is not likely to be followed by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.

Part I of this opinion describes the background and procedural history of this case. Part II analyzes the issues raised by Bazant's appeal.

I.

Otis Elevator Company ("Otis") entered into an elevator maintenance and service contract with the George Washington Hotel Corporation on December 12, 1980. The contract provided for service from January 1, 1981 until December 31, 1990 at the George Washington Hotel in Washington, Pennsylvania. The contract also provided that the contract would be renewed automatically for a five-year term unless a party gave notice of an intent to terminate at least ninety days before the end of the contract term:

Either party may terminate this agreement at the end of the extended contract term selected above or at the end of any subsequent five year period by giving the other party 90 days prior written notice.

Stanley Bazant ("Bazant") is the successor in interest to the George Washington Hotel Corporation and is the only remaining defendant in this case. On November 30, 1990 -- thirty-one days before the end of the extended contract term -- Robert Bazant, Stanley Bazant's son and the Hotel's controller, sent a letter to Otis stating an intent to terminate the contract as of December 31, 1990. On December 6, 1990, a representative of Otis responded by letter. In Otis' view, the contract had already been automatically renewed for a five-year term.

Stanley Bazant disagreed with Otis' position that automatic renewal had occurred. In addition, Bazant withheld payments for the last three months of the contract term (October through December, 1990). According to Bazant, he withheld payments because of problems with Otis' service.

Otis filed the instant action in the United States District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania on November 15, 1991. On January 2, 1992, Otis filed an amended complaint alleging two counts against Bazant: (1) count II, seeking damages from Bazant for breach of contract based on Bazant's failure to pay Otis the monthly contract price for the months of October through December, 1990; and (2) count IV, seeking damages from Bazant based on Bazant's failure to honor the renewed contract term.

On February 6, 1992, Bazant filed an answer to the amended complaint that contained a counterclaim. The counterclaim alleged that Otis had failed to follow through on a commitment to give Bazant a twenty-percent discount.

On July 21, 1992, Bazant moved for partial summary judgment. Bazant argued in that motion that he was entitled to summary judgment on count IV of Otis' complaint because Robert Bazant's November 30, 1990 letter terminated the contract with Otis. Otis filed a response to Bazant's motion, but did not file a cross-motion for summary judgment on count IV.

On August 24, 1992, Otis moved for summary judgment on Bazant's counterclaim. Bazant did not file a response.

In an opinion dated October 9, 1992, the district court denied Bazant's motion for summary judgment on count IV and, acting sua sponte, granted summary judgment to Otis on count IV. The district court also granted Otis' motion for summary judgment on Bazant's counterclaim.

Up to that point in the proceedings, Bazant's only substantive defense to Otis' count IV claim had been that, under the terms of the contract and the applicable Pennsylvania case law, Robert Bazant's letter of termination sufficed to avoid automatic renewal. Five months after the district court granted summary judgment in Otis' favor on count IV, Bazant filed a motion to amend his answer to the amended complaint to include the contention that termination was justified due to Otis' substantial ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.