Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

ROY F. WESTON SERVS. v. HALLIBURTON NUS ENVTL. COR

January 29, 1993

ROY F. WESTON SERVICES, INC.
v.
HALLIBURTON NUS ENVIRONMENTAL CORPORATION v. ROY F. WESTON, INC., and INDIANA LUMBERMEN'S MUTUAL INSURANCE CO.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: BY THE COURT; HERBERT J. HUTTON

 HUTTON, J.

 January 29, 1993

 Presently before the Court are two Motions in Limine filed on behalf of defendant Halliburton NUS Environmental Corporation ("Halliburton NUS") and the plaintiff's response thereto. The first is a Motion in Limine to Preclude Introduction of Certain Pre-Contract Correspondence and Discussions as Parol Evidence to Vary or Explain the Terms of the Contract and the second is a Motion in Limine to Exclude Certain Opinion Testimony by Plaintiff's Expert Thomas Hernon.

 FACTUAL BACKGROUND

 Plaintiff, Roy F. Weston Services, Inc. ("Weston"), is a Texas corporation involved in the business of providing demolition, dismantling and disposal services. On January 26, 1990, Weston entered into a subcontracting agreement with defendant Halliburton NUS to provide its services at the Douglassville Disposal Site located in Berks County, Pennsylvania. Douglassville is a federal Superfund site on the National Priorities List. *fn1" The site is the location of a former oil reprocessing facility. The hazardous waste of concern in the present subcontracting agreement was composed of oils, sludges, solvents, asbestos and contaminated solids such as building materials and tanks.

 Pursuant to the subcontracting agreement, Weston was to dismantle the facility and to dispose of the hazardous liquids and sludges located in the above ground tanks on the site. The specific requirements of the contract included the following: site preparation and maintenance; removal of asbestos materials; pumping of liquids and sludges from the tanks to tanker trucks and the draining of free liquids from the site; dismantling and removal of all buildings, tanks, equipment, piping, drums and miscellaneous materials; waste hauling and disposal; and related services, such as health and safety, sampling and analysis, and decontamination of equipment materials and personnel. The total contract price was not to exceed $ 3,256,731.00.

 During execution of the contract, Weston experienced difficulty with the pumpability of the contents of the tanks. Weston encountered solid material which could not be removed via pumping. Relations between the two parties broke down and Halliburton NUS eventually terminated Weston's rights under the contract. Weston subsequently brought the instant suit.

 DISCUSSION

 A. PAROL EVIDENCE

 Halliburton NUS has filed a motion in limine to exclude certain letters and conversations which occurred between the parties prior to the signing of the agreement. Halliburton NUS contends that the parol evidence rule bars admittance of the information. Weston argues that the agreement is ambiguous and, therefore, the information is admissible under an exception to the parol evidence rule.

 Under Pennsylvania law, the parol evidence rule bars consideration of preliminary negotiations, conversations and verbal agreements when the parties to a contract have reduced their agreement to writing and it appears that the writing represents the entire agreement. Hershey Foods Corp. v. Ralph Chapek, Inc., 828 F.2d 989, 994 (3rd Cir. 1987). However, where a writing is determined to be ambiguous, extrinsic evidence may be admitted to assist in the interpretation of the agreement. Mellon Bank, N.A. v. Aetna Business Credit, 619 F.2d 1001, 1010 (3rd Cir. 1980). The question of ambiguity is a question of law for the court to decide. St. Paul Fire and Marine Ins. Co. v. Lewis, 935 F.2d 1428, 1431 (3rd Cir. 1991); Kroblin Refrigerated Xpress, Inc. v. Pitterich, 805 f.2d 96, 101 (3rd Cir. 1986). If ambiguity is found, the court will allow the use of extrinsic evidence to aid the trier of fact in its interpretation of the ambiguity. Mellon Bank, 619 F.2d at 1011.

 In determining the question of ambiguity, the Court must consider "the actual words of the agreement themselves, as well as any alternative meanings offered by counsel, and extrinsic evidence offered in support of those alternative meanings. St. Paul Fire and Marine, 935 F.2d at 1431. Ambiguity has been defined as "intellectual uncertainty; . . . the condition of admitting two or more meanings, of being understood in more than one way, or referring to two or more things at the same time." Id. quoting Mellon Bank N.A. v. Aetna Business Credit, 619 F.2d 1001, 1011 (3rd Cir. 1980). However, the Court must avoid torturing the language of the agreement to create ambiguity where none exist. St. Paul Fire and Marine, 935 F.2d at 1431.

 This Court must determine whether the agreement is ambiguous with respect to the scope of the contents of the tanks at the Douglassville site. It is Weston's position that the contract called for the removal of liquids and sludges, and not the solids which Weston encountered during its performance of the contract. Halliburton NUS argues that the contract requires the complete removal of the contents of the tanks including ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.