Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

SHERIDAN v. WEINBERGER

December 2, 1987

Thomas E. Sheridan, Wanda Sheridan, Thomas E. S. Sheridan, Miriam V. Olsen, Charles L. Hames and Constance Levy, Plaintiffs
v.
Gilbert Weinberger, Robert Romich, Patricia Romich, First Eastern Bank, N.A., First Eastern Corporation, John and/or Jane Doe and Doe Corporation, Defendants



The opinion of the court was delivered by: NEALON

 WILLIAM J. NEALON, CHIEF UNITED STATES DISTRICT JUDGE.

 Presently before the court is a motion of defendants First Eastern Bank, N. A. and First Eastern Corporation to dismiss Count III of plaintiffs' Complaint. For the reasons set forth below, the motion to dismiss will be denied, but plaintiffs will be directed to file an amended pleading.

 BACKGROUND

 Plaintiffs were formerly shareholders in the Hawley Bank. At all relevant times, defendant Weinberger was a director of the Hawley Bank. See document 11 of the record at 2. *fn1" The relationship of defendants Robert Romich and Patricia Romich to the Hawley Bank is unclear from the present record, and the relationship between First Eastern Bank and the Hawley Bank will be discussed infra.

 According to plaintiffs' Complaint, Robert Romich purchased 241 shares of Hawley Bank stock from plaintiff Olsen in February 1985 for $ 100.00 per share. See document 1 at para. 17. Weinberger subsequently acquired 4,685 shares of Hawley Bank stock from plaintiffs Thomas E. Sheridan and Wanda Sheridan for $ 110.00 per share pursuant to a stock purchase agreement dated March 8, 1985. Id. at para. 18. Weinberger bought an additional 353 shares of Hawley Bank stock from plaintiff Thomas E. S. Sheridan for $ 110.00 per share pursuant to a stock purchase agreement of the same date. Id. at para. 20. The Sheridans received full consideration for each transaction on June 6, 1985. Id. at paras. 19, 21. Robert Romich and Patricia Romich then purchased 16 shares of Hawley Bank stock from plaintiff Hames and 10 shares from plaintiff Levy on June 28, 1985 for $ 85.00 per share. Id. at paras. 22, 23. All of the above stock transactions purportedly involved illegal use of wires and/or mail by defendants. Id. at paras. 40, 41.

 In June 1985, Weinberger allegedly borrowed $ 700,000.00 from First Eastern Bank, N. A. on an unsecured basis. See document 1 at para. 24. Plaintiffs aver that "the funds were used to purchase the Hawley Bank Stock from the named plaintiffs and possibly other Hawley Bank shareholders." Id.

 On July 12, 1985, the directors of the Hawley Bank announced their approval of a proposal from First Eastern Corporation and First Eastern Bank, N. A. to merge the Hawley Bank into the latter defendant. See document 1 at para. 25. First Eastern Bank, N. A. agreed to pay $ 147.00 per share for 40% of the Hawley Bank stock and to transfer 4.05 shares of First Eastern Corporation stock, valued at $ 39.00 per share as of July 12, 1985, for each of the remaining shares of Hawley Bank stock. Id. at para. 26(b).

 Plaintiffs instituted this action on July 10, 1987. They claim that during the course of the stock transactions noted above, Weinberger and the Romiches failed to disclose material information, made misrepresentations and attempted to conceal their fraudulent conduct. Although plaintiffs do not specifically aver that Weinberger and the Romiches were aware of the pending merger at the time of the stock transactions, such understanding on the part of these defendants is central to plaintiffs' Complaint. Count I alleges violations of Section 10(b) and Rule 10b-5; Count II states a claim under the Pennsylvania Securities Act of 1972; Count III asserts violations of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO), 18 U.S.C. ยง 1961 et seq.; Count IV avers common law fraud; and Count V charges that defendants engaged in common law conspiracy. Plaintiffs attempt to hold First Eastern Bank, N. A. and First Eastern Corporation jointly liable with the other defendants under each of the above causes of action as aiders and abettors of their codefendants. Specifically, plaintiffs maintain that "as aiders and abettors of securities fraud, [the bank defendants] are equally responsible for the . . . acts committed by the individual defendants." See document 14 at 5. See also Petro-Tech, Inc. v. Western Co. of North America, 824 F.2d 1349, 1356 (3d Cir. 1987) ("an aider and abettor of two predicate acts can be civilly liable under RICO").

 First Eastern Bank, N. A. and First Eastern Bank Corporation submitted a Motion to Dismiss Count III of the Complaint on August 31, 1987. These defendants argue that plaintiffs did not properly allege a "pattern" of racketeering activity for RICO purposes, failed to adequately aver the "enterprise" element and did not plead fraud with the requisite particularity. See document 9 at 2.

 The parties have briefed the relevant issues, and the pending Motion to Dismiss Count III is now ripe for consideration.

 STANDARD OF REVIEW

 In examining a motion to dismiss, a district court should confine its inquiry to the pleadings and should liberally construe the complaint in favor of the plaintiffs. See Conley v. Gibson, 355 U.S. 41, 2 L. Ed. 2d 80, 78 S. Ct. 99 (1957); Hooten v. Pennsylvania College of Optometry, 601 F. Supp. 1151 (E.D. Pa. 1984). The material allegations of the complaint should be regarded as admitted, and the complaint, or a portion thereof, should not be dismissed unless it appears that the plaintiffs can prove no set of facts in support of ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.