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COMMONWEALTH PENNSYLVANIA v. JERRY JACKSON (05/05/86)

submitted: May 5, 1986.

COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA
v.
JERRY JACKSON, APPELLANT



Appeal from the Order entered August 21, 1985 in the Court of Common Pleas of Philadelphia County, Criminal Division, at No. C.P. 85-007122 and M.C. 84-05-1240.

COUNSEL

Elaine DeMasse, Assistant Public Defender, Philadelphia, for appellant.

Jane C. Greenspan, Assistant District Attorney, Philadelphia, for Com., appellee.

Montemuro, Hoffman and Hester, JJ. Hester, J., files a dissenting statement.

Author: Hoffman

[ 359 Pa. Super. Page 435]

This is an appeal from the denial of a petition for writ of certiorari filed with the Court of Common Pleas of Philadelphia County. Appellant was convicted in the Municipal Court of Philadelphia of carrying a firearm without a license, 18 Pa.C.S.A. § 6106, and carrying a firearm on a public street or place in Philadelphia, 18 Pa.C.S.A. § 6108. Appellant contends that certain physical evidence should have been suppressed because the police lacked either probable cause or reasonable suspicion sufficient to justify the seizure of this evidence. For the following reasons, we vacate the judgment of sentence and remand for a new trial.

On May 12, 1984, two Philadelphia police officers responded to a radio call ordering them to investigate a burglary at 317 N. 63rd St. in Philadelphia. These officers met with the complainant, who stated that at 3:20 p.m. two males had tried to kick in his front door, and that one of them, a black male wearing a gray sweatsuit, ran east on Vine St. N.T. July 13, 1984 at 4; id. April 19, 1985 at 4. Within two or three minutes of responding to the radio call, and approximately two blocks from the complainant's home, the officers spotted appellant, a black male wearing a gray sweatsuit and carrying a blue gym bag, running west on Vine St. towards the scene of the crime. Id. July 13, 1984 at 4-7. The officers stopped appellant, who did not attempt to flee. Without questioning appellant, they patted him down and then searched his opaque, zippered gym bag, within which was found a .32 caliber revolver loaded with one live round of ammunition.*fn1 Id. April 19, 1985 at 5-7.

[ 359 Pa. Super. Page 436]

During a subsequent on-site identification, the complainant did not identify appellant as one of the perpetrators.*fn2 Appellant was then arrested and charged with the instant offenses.

Appellant filed a motion to suppress the revolver, which was denied by the Municipal Court. In a Municipal Court bench trial, appellant was found guilty of the weapons offenses. Appellant subsequently filed a petition for writ of certiorari with the Court of Common Pleas, seeking suppression of the seized evidence. The court denied the petition, prompting this appeal.

The standard for reviewing the propriety of a suppression ruling is well-established:

Our function on review of an order denying a motion to suppress is to determine whether the factual findings of the lower court are supported by the record. In making this determination, we are to consider only the evidence of the prosecution's witnesses and so much of the evidence for the defense as, fairly read in the context of the record as a whole, remains uncontradicted. If, when so viewed, the evidence supports the factual findings, we are bound by such findings and may only reverse if the legal conclusions drawn therefrom are in error.

Commonwealth v. Cavalieri, 336 Pa. Superior Ct. 252, 254-55, 485 A.2d 790, 791 (1984). The threshold for a finding of probable cause to arrest exceeds that for justification of a stop and frisk: "[e]ven in the absence of probable cause, an individual may be stopped and briefly detained." Commonwealth v. Prengle, 293 Pa. Superior Ct. 64, 68, 437 A.2d 992, 994 (1981). Because appellant contends that the evidence should have been suppressed under either standard, we must first determine whether the record ...


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