Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

DANNY WILSON v. COMMONWEALTH PENNSYLVANIA (12/18/81)

decided: December 18, 1981.

DANNY WILSON, PETITIONER
v.
COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, RESPONDENT



Appeal from the Order of the State Civil Service Commission in the case of Danny Wilson v. Clarion State College, Department of Education, Appeal No. 2804.

COUNSEL

Harlan S. Stone, with him John R. Cook, Stone, Duffy, Israel & Cook, for petitioner.

Nancy K. Matlowski, Acting Chief Counsel, with her Jack E. Solomon, Assistant Attorney General, for respondent.

Judges Mencer, Williams, Jr. and Palladino, sitting as a panel of three. Opinion by Judge Palladino. Judge Williams, Jr. dissents.

Author: Palladino

[ 63 Pa. Commw. Page 276]

This is an appeal from an adjudication and order of the State Civil Service Commission (Commission) which affirmed the dismissal of Danny Wilson (petitioner) from his position as a Police Officer I, regular status, at Clarion State College (Clarion). We affirm.

[ 63 Pa. Commw. Page 277]

On April 3, 1979, Arthur Eshbaugh, the acting Director of Public Safety at Clarion, received a complaint from a female student at Clarion who alleged (1) that petitioner had solicited her on two occasions to engage in oral sexual intercourse and (2) that petitioner had called her on the night of April 2, 1979, and told her, inter alia, that he could have used his master key to enter her dormitory room the night before when she was asleep. In response to this complaint, Clarion, by a letter dated April 6, 1979, informed petitioner that he was being temporarily suspended pending an investigation into the student's complaint.

On April 27, 1979, Mr. Eshbaugh and Charles Leach, Clarion's Vice President for Administration, met with petitioner to discuss the student's allegations. At this meeting, petitioner admitted that he had called the student and that he had mentioned the possibility of using his master key to enter her room the night before.*fn1 Petitioner, on the advice of his attorney, however, refused to answer any questions relating to the student's allegations of sexual solicitation on the ground that his answers might tend to be self-incriminating. Shortly after this meeting, Clarion, by a letter dated May 1, 1979, informed petitioner that he was being discharged as of May 4, 1979, because of "the serious nature of the charge of solicitation, which you chose not to answer, and . . . the serious nature of your offer to enter a female student's room for unofficial purposes, while on duty and between the hours of 2:00 a.m. and 4:00 a.m. . . ." Petitioner subsequently appealed this dismissal to the Commission.*fn2

[ 63 Pa. Commw. Page 278]

At a hearing on petitioner's appeal, conducted on July 24, 1979, petitioner alleged (1) that he had been dismissed for failing to cooperate in the investigation of the student's complaint and (2) that this dismissal impermissibly infringed upon his fifth amendment privilege against self-incrimination.*fn3 Clarion, for its part, offered into evidence a signed unsworn complaint from the student involved, and called Mr. Eshbaugh, Mr. Leach, and petitioner as witnesses. Mr. Eshbaugh and Mr. Leach testified, inter alia, as to what occurred during their April 27, 1979, meeting with petitioner, and petitioner once again conceded that he had called the student, but refused to answer any other questions concerning the student's allegations on the basis of his fifth amendment privilege against self-incrimination. Based on this evidence, the Commission subsequently found as a fact that petitioner had called the student on April 2, 1979, and that a complaint had been lodged by the student involved, and concluded (1) that there was no merit in petitioner's constitutional argument and (2) that the student's allegations concerning the April 2, 1979, phone call, coupled with petitioner's refusal to respond to these allegations, created an appearance of impropriety which justified his dismissal. The present appeal followed.

Before this Court, petitioner raises a single issue for our consideration, that being whether or not the Commission erred as a matter of law by concluding that Clarion's dismissal did not impermissibly infringe upon his fifth amendment privilege against self-incrimination. Since we believe that ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.