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CARROLL F. BREADY HYATT A/K/A CARROLL FRANCIS HYATT v. ALBERT THOMAS HYATT (12/28/79)

filed: December 28, 1979.

CARROLL F. BREADY HYATT A/K/A CARROLL FRANCIS HYATT, APPELLANT,
v.
ALBERT THOMAS HYATT



No. 2395 October Term, 1978, Appeal from the Order dated August 21, 1978 of the Court of Common Pleas, Civil-Action-Law, for Delaware County, at No. 9470, 1976.

COUNSEL

Donald W. Lehrkinder, Media, for appellant.

Samuel M. Tollen, Chester, for appellee.

Cercone, President Judge, and Watkins and Hoffman, JJ. Hoffman, J., concurs in the result.

Author: Watkins

[ 273 Pa. Super. Page 436]

This is an appeal from the order of the Court of Common Pleas of Delaware County, by the appellant, which dismissed her complaint in partition filed against her ex-husband requesting partition of a home which was held during the parties' marriage as a tenancy by the entireties.

The parties hereto were husband and wife. Prior to their marriage the appellee (husband) owned a certain piece of real estate situate at R.D. # 2, Glen Mills, Delaware County, Pennsylvania. After their marriage appellee deeded the real estate to himself and the appellant (wife) thereby creating a tenancy by the entireties. The parties subsequently separated with the appellant leaving the Glen Mills' home which was the marital abode. On July 28, 1975, appellant obtained a divorce against the appellee. On July 14, 1976, she instituted a partition action against appellee requesting partition of the real estate. Appellee defended the partition action by presenting a written agreement between the parties by which appellant agreed to allow

[ 273 Pa. Super. Page 437]

    appellee to remain in the property in return for his promise to divide the proceeds of any sale of the property with her. Appellee also alleged that he had agreed to provide appellant with a $7,000.00 automobile, $1,000.00 in cash, and had agreed not to contest the divorce action in return for appellant's promise not to seek partition of the real estate. Appellant admitted signing the written agreement but claims that it is not binding because appellant was provided no consideration for her promise not to seek partition of the real estate. Appellant also alleged that appellee's decision to give the $1,000.00 and the vehicle to her were not part of any agreement relative to the partition and were merely gifts to her. The court below found as a fact that appellant had contacted appellee regarding her financial situation and that appellee had threatened to contest the divorce action. The court went on to find that as a result of discussions between the parties relative to these matters that appellee agreed to pay appellant $1,000.00, to pay off an $1186.33 lien on their jointly held Mercedes-Benz automobile, to turn the automobile over to appellant, and not to contest the divorce all of which appellee did. The court also found that appellee did these things in return for appellant's promise not to seek partition of the Glen Mills' home. Appellant argues that the court below violated the parol evidence role when it permitted into evidence the testimony of appellee regarding the oral agreements between appellee and herself and that without said oral agreements the written agreement is invalid for lack of consideration and that therefore the court erred when it dismissed her complaint in partition.

The Act of May 10, 1977, P.L. 884, Sec. 1; 1949 May 17, P.L. 1394, Sec. 1; 68 P.S. 501 holds that once parties who have held property as entireties property are divorced the nature of their property is changed to a tenancy in common and that either party may then seek to have the property sold and the proceeds divided between the parties by bringing an action in equity for partition of the property. Among tenants in common partition of real property is normally a matter of right. Lykiardopoulos v. Lykiardopoulos,

[ 273 Pa. Super. Page 438453]

Pa. 290, 390 A.2d 548 (1973). However, the statutory right to partition may be modified or postponed for a reasonable time by agreement of the parties. Shoup v. Shoup, 469 Pa. 165, 364 A.2d 1319 (1976). Appellant argues that the writing is invalid as a contract because it fails to provide adequate consideration to her since it obligates appellee to do nothing more than he would ordinarily be required to do (giving her one-half of proceeds) while it prevents her from exercising her absolute right to partition; that the writing is full and complete and appellee should not have been permitted to introduce oral evidence of the other matters (the $1,000, the car and not contesting the divorce); and that the agreement is invalid because it postpones sale of the premises for an unreasonable length of time.

We agree with appellant's first contention. The written agreement signed by appellant gave her nothing more than she already had. A promise to do less than that which the promisor is already obligated to do is no consideration at all. Lewis v. Hamilton's Extrs., 301 Pa. 173, 151 A.2d 812 (1930). Therefore, unless appellee was able to show some other valid ...


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