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COMMONWEALTH PENNSYLVANIA v. TERRANCE CAMP (01/27/75)

decided: January 27, 1975.

COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA
v.
TERRANCE CAMP, APPELLANT



COUNSEL

David Cohen, Philadelphia, for appellant.

F. Emmett Fitzpatrick, Dist. Atty., Richard A. Sprague, First Asst. Dist. Atty., Steven H. Goldblatt, Asst. Dist. Atty., Chief, Appeals Div., Bonnie Leadbetter, Asst. Dist. Atty., Philadelphia, for appellee.

Jones, C. J., and Eagen, O'Brien, Roberts, Pomeroy and Manderino, JJ. Nix, J., took no part in the consideration or decision of this case.

Author: O'brien

[ 459 Pa. Page 570]

OPINION OF THE COURT

Appellant, Terrance Camp, was tried by a judge sitting without a jury and found guilty of murder in the second degree and violations of the Uniform Firearms Act. Post-trial motions were denied and appellant was sentenced to a term of two and one-half to thirteen years in a state correctional institution; sentence on the firearms violations was suspended. This appeal followed.

The facts surrounding this appeal are as follows: On August 14, 1973, appellant, a postal worker who delivered mail, was having lunch at a restaurant in Philadelphia.

[ 459 Pa. Page 571]

While eating lunch he was approached by Hubert Bronzell (the decedent) and Bobby Reed (Reed). The decedent and Reed showed appellant a gun and demanded the relief checks appellant was to deliver on his postal route; appellant refused. The following day the pair visited appellant at the post office and repeated their demands. Appellant again refused. Early the next afternoon, while appellant was eating lunch, the pair approached him, again produced a gun and told him to meet them at 2:00 or 2:30 p. m. at a bar located at Second and York Streets. Eugene Hargrave testified that on the day of the homicide he met appellant and appellant asked him to accompany him to the bar where he was to meet the decedent and Reed. According to Hargrave, appellant told him of the threats but he agreed to go to the bar anyway. Hargrave further testified that shortly after he and appellant entered the bar, Reed arrived. Hargrave then went to Reed and told him not to start anything because appellant had a gun, to which Reed replied: "Let him tell me that." Hargrave stated that after he told appellant what Reed said, Reed started to leave the bar when the decedent, Hubie Bronzell, appeared at the door of the bar. Hargrave stated that he went to the decedent and told him that appellant had a gun, and that while Hargrave and the decedent were talking, appellant came up behind them and the decedent asked: "Ain't nothing happening, man?" to which appellant replied "No." The decedent then turned to walk away and started across the street, and while the decedent was turning to say something to appellant, appellant opened fire on the decedent. Hargrave then stated he asked appellant, "Man, what are you doing?" Appellant did not respond. Hargrave stated that he saw no gun in the possession of the decedent, but that he saw appellant pull his gun from under his hat.

Francis Crumty testified that on the day of the murder he was employed by the Water Department of the

[ 459 Pa. Page 572]

City of Philadelphia, and was across the street from the bar where the homicide occurred. He stated that about 2:00 p. m. he saw three people come out of the Chatterbox Bar, two of whom, the decedent and another man, seemed to be together and were in front. He stated a man in a postman's uniform was behind them. He further testified that decedent's companion stated, "Come on, let's go." Whereupon, the decedent turned to his left and faced the man with the gun who fired one shot. Crumty said that after a pause the man fired four or five more shots and put something in his pocket.

Miss Mayberry, an employee of the bar where the homicide occurred, stated that appellant entered the bar alone at about 2:00 p. m. on the day of the murder and asked for Bobby Reed. Not finding Reed, appellant left and returned shortly with Eugene Hargrave, and the pair started drinking. Shortly thereafter, Reed entered. Hargrave spoke to Reed and as Reed was leaving, the decedent appeared at the door. Appellant then left the bar and Miss Mayberry heard shots and saw the decedent staggering across the street and appellant running up the street. She ...


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