Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

United States v. Hendrick

April 3, 1964

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA EX REL. CARL MELTON, APPELLANT,
v.
EDWARD J. HENDRICK, SUPERINTENDENT, PHILADELPHIA PRISONS.



Author: Kalodner

Before McLAUGHLIN, KALODNER and GANEY, Circuit Judges.

KALODNER, Circuit Judge.

This appeal is from the Order of the District Court denying Carl Melton's petition for a writ of habeas corpus which was premised on his contention that he had been subjected to double jeopardy and cruel and inhumane punishment by the Pennsylvania courts in violation of federal constitutional guarantees.

In April, 1959 Melton pleaded guilty and then changed his plea to "Not Guilty" in the robbery slaying of Rose Schloss. A jury found him guilty of murder in the first degree and fixed the penalty at death. The court en banc granted Melton's motion for a new trial on the ground that an aggregate of prejudicial events at the trial, including an emotional outburst by the bereaved husband of the murdered woman "created such an inflammatory atmosphere that the jury's determination may well have been based upon other than the substantive factual evidence introduced." The Commonwealth appealed to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court contending that the court en banc abused its discretion in granting a new trial. The Commonwealth's appeal was dismissed on the ground that it had no right of appeal inasmuch as the new trial had been granted for factual reasons - prejudicial events at the trial - and under settled Pennsylvania law "It is only where the question involved is purely one of law that the Commonwealth may appeal from an adverse ruling in a criminal case * * *." Commonwealth v. Melton, 402 Pa. 628, 629, 168 A.2d 328, 329 (1961).

Melton's contention at his second trial that the Commonwealth's appeal constituted double jeopardy and violated his constitutional rights was rejected and he then pleaded guilty to murder. In conformity with Pennsylvania criminal practice a three-judge court then held a hearing at which considerable evidence was presented relating to Melton's crime, his early life, environmental background and mentality. Two psychologists and a neuropsychiatrist testified in Melton's behalf that he was a "mental defective", but able to distinguish between right and wrong. The evidence established that Melton had completed the ninth grade in school; he had served in the United States Marine Corps for over a year when he was discharged because of flat feet; at the time of the murder he was 29 years old; married but separated from his wife; the father of five children*fn1

The three-judge court found Melton guilty of murder in the first degree and sentenced him to death. He appealed on the grounds that (1) he had been placed in double jeopardy by the Commonwealth's appeal in violation of his Constitutional rights; (2) the evidence was insufficient to sustain his conviction of murder in the first degree; and (3) the sentencing court abused its discretion when it fixed the penalty at death.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court, after an exhaustive review of the evidence and law applicable to Melton's contentions, affirmed the judgment and sentence. Commonwealth v. Melton, 406 Pa. 343, 178 A.2d 728 (1962). Certiorari was denied by the Supreme Court of the United States, 371 U.S. 851, 83 S. Ct. 93, 9 L. Ed. 2d 87 (1962).

In his petition to the District Court for habeas corpus relief Melton contended only that rights guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States had been violated in that he had been subjected to double jeopardy by the Commonwealth's appeal and "cruel and unusual punishment" when he was sentenced to death despite the fact that he is a "mental defective."

In denying Melton's petition the District Court held with respect to the double jeopardy issue that the Pennsylvania Supreme Court had not decided the Commonwealth's appeal on its "merits" but had dismissed it for lack of appealability and that "even if the Pennsylvania Supreme Court had decided the matter on the merits, one would not be justified in holding that double jeopardy was involved in the appeal." United States v. Hendrick, 218 F.Supp. 293, 295 (E.D.Pa.1963).

We agree with the District Court's holding that under Pennsylvania law Melton "waived his protection against being tried again for the same offense by his application for a new trial, since the court considers that the first jeopardy in which he was placed continues until the time of imposition of legal sentence at a subsequent trial." 218 F.Supp. 295. We are in accord, too, with the District Court's holding that the Fourteenth Amendment is not offended when the state is the moving party in an appeal from an order of the trial court granting a defendant's motion for a new trial following a jury's return of a verdict of guilty. It would serve no useful purpose to elaborate on Judge Van Dusen's excellent discussion of dispositive state*fn2 and federal decisions*fn3 As he so well stated:

"The Pennsylvania procedure, as followed in this case, does not violate that standard of permissible process of law guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment since it does not violate 'the very essence of a scheme of ordered liberty' and because its continuance would not 'violate a "principal of justice so rooted in the traditions and conscience of our people as to be ranked as fundamental."' Bute v. Illinois, 333 U.S. 640, 659, 68 S. Ct. 763, 773, 92 L. Ed. 986 (1948)."

We are further of the opinion that the District Court did not err in holding that the death sentence imposed on Melton did not violate the cruel and unusual punishment provisions of the federal constitution.

As earlier stated, Melton's contention that the death sentence constitutes cruel and unusual punishment is premised on the fact that he is a "mental defective". He has never contended that he was insane at the time of the murder nor does he contend that he was then unable to distinguish between right and wrong. The record discloses that Melton's counsel expressly stated at the sentencing proceedings that he was not attempting to prove that his client was insane but was only presenting the evidence as to his client's mental condition in mitigation of punishment.

The hard core then of Melton's contention is that it is "cruel and unusual punishment" to sentence a mental defective to death when he has been ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.