Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

WENTLING v. POPULAR SCI. PUBL. CO.

September 11, 1959

S. A. WENTLING, Plaintiff,
v.
POPULAR SCIENCE PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc., National Rifle Association of America, Henry Holt and Company, Inc., Lyman Gun Sight Corporation and John Unertl, trading as John Unertl Optical Co., Defendants



The opinion of the court was delivered by: FOLLMER

This is a private anti-trust action for treble damages under Sections 1 and 2 of the Sherman Act (15 U.S.C.A. §§ 1 and 2) and Section 12 of the Clayton Act (15 U.S.C.A. § 22).

It appears from the complaint that the plaintiff, S. A. Wentling, is a partnership composed of Stanley A. Wentling and F. Robert Kreider, with its principal place of business at Palmyra, Lebanon County, in the Middle Judicial District of Pennsylvania; that the defendants herein involved are

 (a) Popular Science Publishing Company, Inc. (hereinafter referred to as 'Popular Science'), a New York corporation with its principal place of business in New York City, also qualified to do business in Pennsylvania, with its principal registered office in Pennsylvania located at 400 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton.

 (b) National Rifle Association of America (hereinafter referred to as 'National'), a New York corporation with its principal office in Washington, D.C.

 (c) Lyman Gun Sight Corporation (hereinafter referred to as 'Lyman'), a Connecticut corporation with its principal office and place of business at Middle-field, Connecticut.

 Action against John Unertl, trading as John Unertl Optical Co., was dismissed by order of court on stipulation of counsel.

 Counsel for plaintiff and Henry Holt and Company, Inc., stipulated that Holt would not be required to answer or further plead until the motions hereinafter referred to were disposed of.

 The matter is presently before the Court on

 (a) Motion of National to dismiss the action as to it because of improper venue.

 (b) Motion of Lyman to dismiss complaint as to it because of improper venue.

 (c) Motion of Popular Science to quash the summons and dismiss the complaint as to it because.

 (1) Improper service.

 (2) Because of plaintiff's failure to register under Pennsylvania Fictitious Name Act, 54 P.S.Pa. § 28.1 et seq., plaintiff has no capacity to maintain this action.

 (3) Complaint fails to state a cause of action upon which relief may be granted.

 (4) Complaint states two separate and distinct causes of action in a single count in disregard of Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, rule 10(b), 28 U.S.C.A.

 (5) Complaint fails to state sufficient facts to establish defendant's involvement in any conspiracy as to plaintiff, that plaintiff was injured by defendant, or that any of alleged injuries or damages were caused by defendant.

 In the alternative, Popular Science moves for more specific statement.

 In the further alternative, Popular Science moves to strike certain alleged scandalous and impertinent statement.

 The applicable venue section of the Clayton Act (15 U.S.C.A. § 22) provides in pertinent part as follows:

 'Any suit, action, or proceeding under the antitrust laws against a corporation may be brought not only in the judicial district whereof it is an inhabitant, but also in any district wherein it may be found or transacts business; and all process in such cases may be served in the district of which it is an inhabitant, or wherever it may be found.'

 As to National Rifle Association of America.

 Attached to National's motion to dismiss was the affidavit of Frank C. Daniel, its Secretary, to which is attached copy of charter and amendment thereto.

 National was incorporated in 1871 in the State of New York, pursuant to Act of April 11, 1865, entitled 'An Act for the Incorporation of Societies or Clubs, for certain Social and recreative purposes.' It is a nonprofit, nonbusiness, nonstock organization supported by membership dues. Its original objects or purposes are the 'improvement of its members in markmanship, and to promote the introduction of the system of aiming drill and rifle practice as part of the military drill of the National Guard of this and other states, and for those purposes, to provide a suitable range or ranges in the vicinity of the City of New York.' The charter was amended in 1956 in order to add the following purposes to those stated originally:

 'And to promote social welfare and public safety, law and order, and the national defense; to educate and train citizens of good repute in the safe and efficient handling of small arms, and in the technique of design, production and group instruction; to increase the knowledge of small arms and promote efficiency in the use of such arms on the part of members of law enforcement agencies, of the armed forces, and of citizens who would be subject to service in ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.