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COMMONWEALTH v. CRAMER (11/14/50)

November 14, 1950

COMMONWEALTH
v.
CRAMER



COUNSEL

John Patrick Walsh, Leon Rosenfield, Philadelphia, for appellant.

Colbert C. McClain, Assistant District Attorney, John H. Maurer, District Attorney, Philadelphia, for appellee.

Before Rhodes, P. J., and Hirt, Reno, Dithrich, Ross, Arnold and Gunther, JJ.

Author: Arnold

[ 168 Pa. Super. Page 2]

ARNOLD, Judge.

The appellant was convicted on one indictment charging (1) assault, armed with an offensive weapon, with intent to rob; (2) robbery, being armed with an offensive

[ 168 Pa. Super. Page 3]

    weapon; (3) committing a crime of violence while being armed with a firearm. He was convicted on two counts of a second indictment, (1) carrying a concealed deadly weapon; and (2) unlawful carrying of a firearm without a license.

The verdict of the jury established that Trainer, the victim, a head waiter at one of the prominent Philadelphia hotels, from time to time went to the City of Reading to gamble, in which he was very successful. In these excursions one Weinstein usually drove him in an automobile. On April 3, 1949, Weinstein, by appointment, picked up Trainer, who rode in the back seat. In the front seat was one Silverstein, and with Trainer in the back seat a man named Greenstein.

On the outskirts of Philadelphia the car stopped at a red light and the defendant, Cramer, entered the automobile, ordered the driver to proceed in a new direction, and in the vicinity of Vine and Water Streets required the driver to stop. The defendant drew a gun, ordered Trainer and Greenstein out of the car, and took from Trainer $4,000. The defendant next ordered Silverstein out of the car and drove away with Weinstein. Trainer, Silverstein and Greenstein reported the robbery to a local police station.

When the case was called for trial*fn1 defendant's counsel moved for a continuance, averring that Weinstein, Greenstein and Silverstein were eyewitnesses to the alleged robbery; that their names were not endorsed on the indictments; and that the defendant's attorney and writ server had made diligent and unsuccessful efforts to subpoena these three witnesses at various times between May 2 and May 9. It was further averred that these witnesses were essential to the defendant's case; that it was the duty of the Commonwealth to produce them in Court; and that the defendant intended to call

[ 168 Pa. Super. Page 4]

    them on his own behalf if they were not called by the Commonwealth. It was averred that the defendant was in jail awaiting trial, and that no harm could result to the Commonwealth by a continuance. Defendant's counsel also suggested that the witnesses in question did not and would not identify the defendant as the robber. The only reply by the Commonwealth was that these witnesses had been interrogated by its officers and that all said they could not tell who committed the robbery; that one of them thought it was committed by a Negro; and that the only identification testimony of the Commonwealth was that of the victim, Trainer. The Commonwealth could have produced them, and in fact a few days after the instant verdict the Commonwealth did bring them in and asked the court to hold them as a committing magistrate. We think common fairness made it the duty of the Commonwealth to have produced these witnesses in court at the trial, or to show reasonable efforts to produce them; or, in view of the defendant's efforts to obtain the witnesses, that a continuance be granted. All of the difficulty and any motion for a continuance would have been avoided had the Commonwealth conformed to the practice suggested in Commonwealth v. Sarkis et al., 164 Pa. Super. 194, 199, 63 A.2d 360, and had the eyewitnesses present in court, notifying the defendant ...


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