Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

DANCIGER ET AL. v. COOLEY

January 7, 1919

DANCIGER ET AL., DOING BUSINESS AS DANCIGER BROTHERS
v.
COOLEY



ERROR TO THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF KANSAS

White, McKenna, Holmes, Day, Van Devanter, Pitney, McReynolds, Brandeis, Clarke

Author: Van Devanter

[ 248 U.S. Page 321]

 MR. JUSTICE VAN DeVANTER delivered the opinion of the court.

Danciger Brothers, who conducted a mail-order liquor business in Kansas City, Missouri, brought this suit in a Kansas court to recover from Cooley certain moneys collected by him, under an arrangement with them, as the purchase price of intoxicating liquors sold by them in interstate commerce, and also to enforce a similar claim assigned to them by another liquor dealer. After issue and trial Cooley prevailed and the judgment was affirmed; the appellate court holding that the arrangement under which the moneys were collected involved a violation of § 239 of the Criminal Code of the United States, c. 321, 35 Stat. 1136, and that, applying the settled rule of the Kansas courts, a principal who employs an agent to make collections in violation of a criminal law cannot compel the agent to account for what he collects. 98 Kansas, 38 and 484. The case is here on writ of error sued out prior to the Act of September 6, 1916, c. 448, 39 Stat. 726.

These are the facts: During the year 1910 Danciger Brothers received through the mails several orders for whiskey from customers in Topeka, Kansas, and in each instance shipped the liquor from Kansas City, Missouri, to Topeka, as freight. Each package was consigned to the shipper's order and was to be delivered by the carrier only on the surrender of the bill of lading properly endorsed. A sight draft was drawn on the customer for the purchase price and this with the bill of lading attached was sent to Cooley under an arrangement whereby he was to collect the draft, was then to hand the bill of lading

[ 248 U.S. Page 322]

     suitably endorsed to the customer to enable the latter to get the package from the carrier, and ultimately was to remit to Danciger Brothers the amount collected less a commission for the service rendered. Before this arrangement was made the banks had refused to make such collections.

The assigned claim need not be separately described, for it was essentially like the other.

As the transactions occurred before the passage of the Webb-Kenyon Act, c. 90, 37 Stat. 699, we are not concerned with it, but only with the situation theretofore existing.

Whether § 239 of the Criminal Code reaches and embraces acts done by an agent such as Cooley was in this instance, or is confined to acts of common carriers and their agents, is a question about which there has been some contrariety of opinion, and it is now before this court for the first time. Of course, the chief factor in its solution must be the words of the statute. Omitting what is irrelevant here, they are:

"Sec. 239. Any railroad company, express company, or other common carrier, or any other person who, in connection with the transportation of any . . . intoxicating liquor . . . from one State . . . into any other State, . . . shall collect the purchase price or any part thereof, before, on, or after delivery, from the consignee, or from any other person, or shall in any manner act as the agent of the buyer or seller of any such liquor, for the purpose of buying or selling or completing the sale thereof, saving only in the actual transportation and delivery of the same, shall be fined," etc.

A reference to the conditions existing when the section was enacted, in 1909, will, together with its words, conduce to a right understanding of the evil at which it is aimed and the ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.