Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

AMERICAN SUGAR REFINING COMPANY v. UNITED STATES.

decided: November 30, 1908.

AMERICAN SUGAR REFINING COMPANY
v.
UNITED STATES.



APPEAL FROM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK.

Author: Fuller

[ 211 U.S. Page 157]

 MR. CHIEF JUSTICE FULLER delivered the opinion of the court.

The tariff act of July 24, 1897, c. 11, 30 Stat. 151, provides (p. 168):

[ 211 U.S. Page 158]

     "Par. 209. Sugars not above number sixteen Dutch standard in color, tank bottoms, sirups of cane juice, melada, concentrated melada, concrete and concentrated molasses, testing by the polariscope not above seventy-five degrees, ninety-five one-hundreths of one per cent per pound, and for every additional degree shown by the polariscopic test, thirty-five one-thousandths of one cent per pound additional, and fractions of a degree in proportion; and on sugar above number sixteen Dutch standard in color, and on all sugar which has gone through a process of refining, one cent and ninety-five one-hundreths of one cent per pound; molasses testing above forty degrees and not above fifty-six degrees, three cents per gallon; testing fifty-six degrees and above, six cents per gallon; sugar drainings and sugar sweepings shall be subject to duty as molasses or sugar, as the case may be, according to polariscopic test: . . ."

In October, 1897, the Treasury Department issued general regulations*fn1 (subsequently modified in particulars not material here) governing sampling and classification of sugars under the above-quoted paragraph, which, among other things, declared:

"The expression 'testing . . . degrees by the polariscope,' occurring in the act, is construed to mean the percentage of pure sucrose contained in the sugar as ascertained by polarimetric estimation."

It was further stated that changes of temperature affect the indications of a polariscope, and to determine by means of it true sucrose contents apparent readings must be corrected as shown by a table accompanying each instrument and embodying the results of careful experiments therewith; when the thermometer is above 17.5 degrees Centigrade, the point of standardization, additions must be made; when below, corresponding subtractions.

[ 211 U.S. Page 159]

     The interpretation of the statute and validity of the regulations were at once challenged by importers, who claimed that the reading of a polariscope is not affected by change in temperature; and, further, that the term "polariscopic test" in the tariff act of 1897, according to its well-settled commercial use, as well as by the language itself, requires testing only in the way theretofore observed by merchants, and forbids any correction of the result observed by the eye. These contentions were denied by the collector.

The importers appealed to the Board of General Appraisers, and in March, 1899, their protest was overruled in a considered opinion. G.A. 4386.

Under the titles Bartram Bros. v. United States, Howell v. United States and The American Sugar Refining Company v. United States, appeal was taken to the Circuit Court, Southern District of New York, which was decided May 4, 1903. 123 Fed. Rep. 327. That court reversed the judgment of the General Appraisers, holding that the term, "testing by the polariscope," had a well-settled commercial meaning prior to 1897, and must be interpreted according thereto. It declared, however, the preponderance of proof sustained the contention "that there is a variation in the reading of the polariscope, according to variations in temperature at the place where the sugar is tested, and that the corrections and additions provided for by the regulations merely consist in an addition of 3 per cent for each 10 degrees Centigrade of temperature above that at which the polariscope is standardized, and that in this way the actual amount of pure sucrose in each sample is more accurately determined than was the case under the old eye test."

The Circuit Court of Appeals (131 Fed. Rep. 833) reversed the Circuit Court and sustained the General Appraisers. It held Congress intended there should be a scientific determination, by means of the polariscope, of sucrose contents, and that the method prescribed by the ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.