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DAVIS AND FARNUM MANUFACTURING COMPANY v. LOS ANGELES.

decided: March 2, 1903.

DAVIS AND FARNUM MANUFACTURING COMPANY
v.
LOS ANGELES.



APPEAL FROM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES FOR THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA.

Author: Brown

[ 189 U.S. Page 216]

 MR. JUSTICE BROWN, after making the foregoing statement, delivered the opinion of the court.

1. As the bill in this case is based not only upon diversity of citizenship, but upon the alleged unconstitutionality of the municipal ordinances of November 25, 1901, and March 3, 1902, as impairing the obligation of Mrs. Dobbins' contract with the city under prior ordinances, an appeal lies directly to this court, and upon such appeal the whole case is opened for consideration. Horner v. United States, No. 2, 143 U.S. 570; Chappell v. United States, 160 U.S. 499. The State having delegated certain powers to the city, the ordinances of the municipal authorities in this particular are the acts of the State through one of its properly constituted instrumentalities, and their unconstitutionality is the unconstitutionality of a state law within the

[ 189 U.S. Page 217]

     meaning of section 5 of the Circuit Court of Appeals act. City Railway Co. v. Citizens' R.R. Co., 166 U.S. 557; Penn Mutual Life Insurance Co. v. Austin, 168 U.S. 685, 694; St. Paul Gas Light Co. v. St. Paul, 181 U.S. 142, 148.

2. The court below did not pass upon the validity of these ordinances, but came to the conclusion that a bill in equity would not lie to restrain their enforcement, and in this aspect we shall discuss the case. As the only method employed for the enforcement of these ordinances was by criminal proceedings, it follows that the prayer of the bill to enjoin the city from enforcing these ordinances, or prevent plaintiff from carrying out its work, must be construed as demanding the discontinuance of such criminal proceedings as were already pending, and inhibiting the institution of others of a similar character.

That a court of equity has no general power to enjoin or stay criminal proceedings unless they are institited by a party to a suit already pending before it, and to try the same right that is in issue there, or to prohibit the invasion of the rights of property by the enforcement of an unconstitutional law, was so fully considered and settled in an elaborate opinion by Mr. Justice Gray, In re Sawyer, 124 U.S. 200, that no further reference to prior authorities is deemed necessary, and we have little more to do than to consider whether there is anything exceptional in the case under consideration to take it out of the general rule. The plaintiff in the case of Sawyer sought to restrain the mayor and committee of a city in Nebraska from removing a city officer under charges filed against him for malfeasance in office. This was held to fall within the general rule and not within the exception.

The general rule that a Circuit Court of the United States, sitting as a court of equity, cannot stay by injunction proceedings pending in a state court to enforce the criminal laws of such State, was applied in Harkrader v. Wadley, 172 U.S. 148, to a case where the plaintiff sought to enjoin proceedings against him for the embezzlement of the assets of a bank; and in Fitts v. McGhee, 172 U.S. 516, to a suit brought by the receiver of a railroad against the attorney general of the State to restrain him from instituting or prosecuting criminal proceedings

[ 189 U.S. Page 218]

     to enforce against the plaintiff the provisions of a state law reducing the tolls, which had been exacted of the public by the railroad, of which the plaintiff was receiver. This was held to be in reality a suit against the State to enjoin the institution of criminal proceedings, and hence within the general rule. See also Prout v. Starr, 188 U.S. 537.

Plaintiff seeks to maintain its bill under the exception above noted, wherein, in a few cases, an injunction has been allowed to issue to restrain an invasion of rights of property by the enforcement of an unconstitutional law, where such enforcement would result in irreparable damages to the plaintiff. It cites in that regard the case of Reagan v. Farmers' Loan & Trust Co., 154 U.S. 362, in which, under a law of Texas giving express authority to a railroad company or other party in interest to bring suit against the railroad commissioners of that State, a bill was sustained against such commission to restrain the enforcement of unreasonable and unjust rates, and in the opinion a few instances were cited where bills were sustained against officers of the State, who, under color of an unconstitutional statute, were committing acts of wrong and injury to the rights and property of the plaintiff acquired under a contract with the State. It would seem that, if there were jurisdiction in a court of equity to enjoin the invasion of property rights through the instrumentality of an unconstitutional law, that jurisdication would not be ousted by the fact that the State had chosen to assert its power to enforce such law by indictment or other criminal proceeding. Springhead Spinning Co. v. Riley, L.R. 6 Eq. 551, 558.

In order to determine the exact property rights at stake in the case under consideration it should be borne in mind that this is not a bill by Mrs. Dobbins, the owner of the land and of the proposed gas works, to enjoin the city from interfering with carrying out the permit she had obtained to erect these gas works, nor by the Valley Gas and Fuel Company, with which she had made a contract to erect these works; but by a subcontractor, which had made a contract with the Gas and Fuel ...


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